Circle of Fifths

Ozaukee Talent Pop-Up Drum Circle 6.18.22 6-7 pm Lime Kiln Park, Grafton WI

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Read Time:3 Minute, 33 Second

Need to Register?

Bring something to sit on, beverage, and percussion instrument of any kind only if you have one.  If not, something will be provided.

Notes for Drum Circle Attendees

6.18.22 Lime Kiln Park 6-7 pm created by Drum Circle Facilitator Angie Mack

Contact:  angie@ozaukeetalent.com

I am going to spend no more than 5-10 minutes explaining the vision for this drum circle which is scheduled to end at 7:00.  

Once we get started, I may pause and occasionally ask some guided questions for whoever wants to share.  I might ask things like:

  • What is your relationship with drumming? (It’s OK to say, “I am brand new at this”.)  
  • Why are you here?  Is it for personal growth such as to experience the physical, mental, spiritual or social benefits of drumming?  Is it because you are concerned about modern day events and need a place to come together with others?  Are you here to support me?  Are you unsure of why you are here?
  • What is your current authentic mood?  Embarrassed?  Proud?  Crabby?  Thankful?  Spiritual?  Stressed?  Drumming helps us to be mindful or “in the moment”.  

In brief, I have been an arts leader in Ozaukee County for about 26 years.  I am deeply concerned about the stress that modern day events have had on people and families.  I am not here with any type of political or religious affiliation.  I am here because I know, through experience, that music has two special qualities:  It heals.  And it brings people together.

Music is a universal language.  It’s all inclusive.  Making a beat is something that anyone can do.  It goes back to the very beginnings of human civilization.  Archaeologist Sergei Bibikov said that the first instruments were made out of mammoth bones   https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000049687

This gathering has zero to do with musical ability or prowess.  It is about experimenting with your instrument to bring sounds that contribute to the sound of the group.  It is about getting back to the very roots and basics of what it means to coexist with other people.  Occasionally I might gesture with my arm so that we can find a steady beat together.  Or I might gesture to play a little quieter or a little louder.  My job as the drum circle facilitator is to conduct musical and interpersonal unity.

I have always been fascinated by circles.   In fact, music is based on a scientific or mathematical law called the Circle of Fifths.  In addition, some of you may or may not know that some of the earliest and foundational songs in American history were etched into circles of wax about one block north of Lime Kiln Park.  

Circle of Fifths

I often joke that I don’t like parades because they are “too linear”.  I conduct many of my music and arts classes in circles.  I feel comfortable in circles.  At the center of today’s drum circle, I see love and respect.  `I see love and respect for you because you have a journey that is different than mine.  I hope that you can have love and respect for me because I have had a different journey than you.  As human beings, we should cheer each other on to be their best selves.  

I don’t see a lot of that in our modern day culture.  Have we really evolved as human beings if we are committing increasingly worse atrocities against one another?  

Guiding Rules

  • No talking during the session.  The goal is to listen to each other, to nature and to ourselves.  
  • Watch me for cues to get on the same beat, to get quieter or louder.  Otherwise, know that you sound great.  
  • Be comfortable.  Mostly with yourself.  Come and go as you need to.  If you need to phone or text, please step outside of the circle temporarily.  
  • Feel free to try different instruments.  Put yours in the middle of the circle and try something different for awhile.  
  • I might pause to take photos, audio or video for social media.

$10 suggested donation.  Cash. Venmo. Paypal. Etc…

REGISTRATION LINK FOR TODAY AND FUTURE DRUM CIRCLES

Any Questions?  Otherwise, there will be more opportunities to share once we get going.

About Post Author

ozaukeetalent

One lesson. One song. One event at a time. Ozaukee Talent is a training and networking facility for people of all ages wanting to advance in the arts. Ozaukee Talent was founded by longtime arts leader Angie Mack in 2016. Ozaukee Talent provides private music and acting lessons, contracted event marketing, contracted arts project management, consulting, arts public speaking and performing, hosts musical events, workshops and classes in the arts. Contact: Ozaukee Talent 1701 11th Ave. Grafton WI 53024 angie@ozaukeetalent.com 262.309.4112 Follow @ozaukeetalent on Instagram and Facebook. Tax deductible donations for Ozaukee Talent through Create Wisconsin, Inc. Venmo: @ozaukeetalent PayPal: angie@ozaukeetalent.com
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John McGivern Highlights Grafton’s Music and Arts History on PBS

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About Post Author

ozaukeetalent

One lesson. One song. One event at a time. Ozaukee Talent is a training and networking facility for people of all ages wanting to advance in the arts. Ozaukee Talent was founded by longtime arts leader Angie Mack in 2016. Ozaukee Talent provides private music and acting lessons, contracted event marketing, contracted arts project management, consulting, arts public speaking and performing, hosts musical events, workshops and classes in the arts. Contact: Ozaukee Talent 1701 11th Ave. Grafton WI 53024 angie@ozaukeetalent.com 262.309.4112 Follow @ozaukeetalent on Instagram and Facebook. Tax deductible donations for Ozaukee Talent through Create Wisconsin, Inc. Venmo: @ozaukeetalent PayPal: angie@ozaukeetalent.com
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Ozaukee Talent Announces #blueschool Coming in 2017

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Read Time:3 Minute, 26 Second

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE OCTOBER 24, 2016 

GRAFTON, WI  Ozaukee Talent is pleased to announce the addition of a blues school coming in 2017.   The blues school will be held on the weekends and will feature blues music workshops where musicians can learn from other blues musicians.  The blues school will be an extension of Ozaukee Talent’s current music education programming.

Alex Wilson Blues Guitar Workshop Grafton WI

“When I was a music major, I learned how to sing Italian Opera and analyze the music of European composers.  The general attitude toward the blues was that it was a ‘lesser art form’ that only used the basic I, IV, V chords.  From a musician’s standpoint, I have come to appreciate the blues as an advanced American-born art form.  Most American music education programs (including universities) fail to give the blues the attention it deserves. From its earliest beginnings, blues secrets have been passed from musician to musician. Experienced blues musicians teach ‘their students’ technique tricks through their recordings and open jam sessions.  

People don’t typically go to music college to become great blues musicians.  They spend their time listening to other blues musicians and then they put their own twist on it.  I love that the blues is the musical language of the common man.  It is an equal opportunity musical language that involves a mutual trust among musicians and not just an elite few.  Do you like the phrase ‘Made in America’?  The blues is an American-made product that is recognized and respected around the globe.  My biggest beef with the American music education system is that it places too much emphasis on the classical composers and European-born music and not enough on the blues genre which should be a source of pride.  As blues musician Willy Dixon said, ‘The blues is the roots.  The rest is the fruits.’  

There is a community among musicians that I would like to see in Grafton, WI. Why Grafton?  If you look at any musical genre tree,  you will see that at the very bottom toward the roots is a genre called the Delta Blues.  Musician pioneers in the Delta Blues include musicians like Charlie Patton, Son House, and Skip James to name a few.   These three mentioned musicians recorded in Grafton, WI between 1929 and 1932.  And there were many more recording artists.  It is for this reason that Grafton is a key location for a blues school.  We all heard that Bob Dylan just won the Nobel Peace Prize. And where do you think Dylan got his musical chops from?  I had the privilege of interviewing Skip James’ nephew several years ago and he talked about Dylan coming over to the house and how he adored Skip James.

I have worked with and have known musicians for most of my adult life.   By default or by nature, musicians tend to isolate.   A lot of them are brilliant, highly passionate yet incredibly shy.  And those who want to make it HAVE to be teachable.   They have to come out of the wood works and collaborate with others on a frequent basis so that their skills can be sharpened and their art form can become inspired.”

–Angie Mack Reilly, founder of Ozaukee Talent and co-founder of http://paramountshome.org

Ozaukee Talent is now booking blues musicians to be a part of the school in 2017 whether through video appearance or in person.  Anyone with comments, questions or an interest to help the  Ozaukee Talent Blues School should email angie@ozaukeetalent.com soon.

bob-dylan-guitar-photo-library-of-congress

ABOUT THE BOB DYLAN PHOTO

  • Title: [Bob Dylan and man, half-length portrait, seated, facing each other, playing guitars in restaurant] / Gilbert-Look.
  • Creator(s): Gilbert, Douglas R., 1942-, photographer
  • Date Created/Published: 1964 June 15.
  • Medium: 1 photographic print (contact sheet frame)
  • Reproduction Number: LC-USZ6-2311 (b&w film copy neg.)
  • Rights Advisory: Publication may be restricted. For information see “LOOK Magazine Photograph…” (http://lcweb.loc.gov/rr/print/res/074_look.html)
  • Call Number: LOOK – Job 64-1887, frame 31 [P&P]
  • Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA

About Post Author

ozaukeetalent

One lesson. One song. One event at a time. Ozaukee Talent is a training and networking facility for people of all ages wanting to advance in the arts. Ozaukee Talent was founded by longtime arts leader Angie Mack in 2016. Ozaukee Talent provides private music and acting lessons, contracted event marketing, contracted arts project management, consulting, arts public speaking and performing, hosts musical events, workshops and classes in the arts. Contact: Ozaukee Talent 1701 11th Ave. Grafton WI 53024 angie@ozaukeetalent.com 262.309.4112 Follow @ozaukeetalent on Instagram and Facebook. Tax deductible donations for Ozaukee Talent through Create Wisconsin, Inc. Venmo: @ozaukeetalent PayPal: angie@ozaukeetalent.com
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Embracing The Legacy Of The Blues / From the South To The North by Michael “Hawkeye” Herman Part 2. Grafton, WI and Paramount Records

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Embracing The Legacy Of The Blues / From the South To The North

By Michael “Hawkeye” Herman

www.HawkeyeHerman.com

Part 2. Grafton, WI and Paramount Records

originally published in the international BLUES FESTIVAL GUIDE 2006

also published at http://www.hawkeyeherman.com/articles.htm

History, dreams, meaningful coincidences, timing, synchronicity, networking, and the blues, can come together to transform a community.

Grafton, Wisconsin is a town of 11,000 inhabitants approximately 25 north of Milwaukee on US 43. In recent years, the town has struggled with its identity in the shadow of nearby communities that had achieved status, economic growth, and recognition as tourist destinations as a result of capitalizing on their local history. Port Washington, a few miles to the northeast, has a long, colorful history as a Great Lakes port and has a restored downtown nestled against a lovely harbor. Cedarburg, just a few miles to the southeast, draws throngs of weekend tourists who walk the main street spending their dollars in shops, restaurants, and galleries that are housed in carefully maintained 19th Century Americana buildings. Grafton has long been considered an anonymous working class town that you have to drive through in order to get to and from Port Washington and Cedarburg. How could Grafton, with seemingly little local history to promote beyond the legacy of the lime kilns in Grafton’s Lime Kiln Park, find its identity, capitalize on it, and step out into the sunlight with its own sense of civic pride?

Angela Mack is a musician/music teacher who moved with her family to Grafton from Madison, WI in 1996. She has a passion for African American culture, music history, and a desire to bring arts to her new home community. A few years ago, she received a letter from a record collector. The letter had been sent to many Grafton residents. It was from a record collector who was in the area looking for old Paramount 78 rpm records. This was the first time she had heard about the Paramount Records that were produced and recorded in Grafton. She didn’t believe it, thought it was a chain letter, and threw it away. Later, she was researching Grafton history on the Internet, and sure enough, it was true. There had been a very important and influential record production plant, Paramount Records, in Grafton.

Angela became obsessed with knowing more about the history and importance of Paramount. The more she learned, the more confused she got. “Why wasn’t this a big deal in Grafton?” She became intrigued with finding out the history of Paramount Records.  Embracing The Legacy Of The Blues / From the South To The North Angela found that Grafton was more than just a footnote in America’s musical history. In the early 20th Century The Wisconsin Chair Company in nearby Port Washington manufactured furniture. The manufacturing of wooden furniture led the company into the production of wood cabinets for record players. The production of the record cabinets led them to produce Paramount Records in cooperation with New York Recording Laboratories (NYRL). Under the Paramount label, they released a continuous flow of jazz, gospel, and outstanding blues recordings. The blues recordings were marketed under the Paramount 12000/13000 “race” series. Between 1929 and 1932, NYRL operated a recording studio in Grafton. The host of seminal blues artists whose music was released on the Paramount label includes Ma Rainey, Ida Cox, Blind Blake, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Charley Patton, Son House, Skip James, Willie Brown, Louise Johnson, King Solomon Hill, The Mississippi Sheiks, Tommy Johnson, Henry Townsend, and many others. Paramount released twenty-five percent of the blues recordings that were marketed during this era, and dominated the blues marketplace. Due to the stock market crash and failing economy during the Great Depression, Paramount began to decline. They ceased recording studio activities in mid 1932, although they were able to ship records until late 1933. Paramount then went out of business.

Now Angela understood why she had received a mass-mailed letter from a record collector seeking old Paramount 78s. Vintage blues enthusiasts and collectors get very excited at the prospect of acquiring old Paramount recordings. Those old 78s are the most sought after of blues recordings. They can be sold at auction for large sums of money. Finding a previously thought to be ‘lost’ Paramount record is a milestone in the life of a record collector, as well as a milestone in the documentation of American music history. In the words of Paramount Records historian, Alex van der Tuuk, “The importance of the record company and its studio cannot be underestimated. Charley Patton is considered King of the Delta Blues, partially based on his recorded output recorded in Grafton.”

The flames of Angela’s passion for African American culture, music, and history were fanned and the Grafton link to Paramount was just the catalyst that was needed to put her interests into action. She spent time at the old Paramount factory location watching the Milwaukee River tumble over the rocks, musing over the last few brick remains of the foundation of the building, and re-read the small roadside sign that marked the historic site. Later, the idea that there should be a blues festival in Grafton at Lime Kiln Park to honor the legacy of Grafton and the blues came to her in a dream.

She took her idea for a blues festival to the Village officials. Village President, Jim Brunnquell, says, “It took several more communications from Angela before I truly realized what a historical treasure the Village possessed.” He was now intrigued by the idea. Grafton was in the middle of a major downtown redevelopment effort. In addition, they were looking at marketing tools to attract and retain business. One quality that was needed was an identity, a hook, or concept that they could build their presence.  The ‘lost’ legacy of Paramount Records just might be the keystone that was needed to achieve all of these municipal goals. Brunnquell pursued the concept with Village officials, and he pointed Angela to the Grafton Jaycees for the possible production of a blues festival.

In early 2005, she got in touch with Alex van der Tuuk, author of “Paramount’s Rise and Fall, A History of the Wisconsin Chair Company and its Recording Activities.” Via very long distance, (van der Tuuk lives in the Netherlands), he offered Angela input, information, and moral support. Alex suggested that Angela’s husband, Patrick, start a Paramount web site to gain support from others and to begin networking. They got the web site up and running, and Alex and Angela doggedly started doing outreach to everyone they knew.

At this point, Angela posted a message online at The Blindman’s Blues Forum seeking advice, guidance, and support for her efforts to raise the Paramount/blues consciousness in Grafton. This writer saw her post on that forum, took a great deal of interest in her cause, and responded. I began advising and mentoring her toward her goals. Little did I know at that time how involved I would be in the Grafton/Paramount process, and how far all of these projects would progress in less than a year.

Meanwhile, local chef/restaurateur, Joe Krupski, was planning for a restaurant somewhere in the downtown area of Grafton. He was aware that there was a market need for dining in that area. His eyes kept turning towards a building sitting on the corner of Wisconsin Avenue/12th Street and Bridge Street–right in the heart of downtown Grafton. The building at 1304 – 12th Avenue had been vacant for quite some time, so he figured the owner would be very open to any idea that might work. He began constructing a business plan around this building in November 2004. He learned from the owner that the building was the first county courthouse and that it was nearly 160 years old–the oldest commercial building still standing in Grafton. He became interested in learning more about the building so that he could incorporate that into his business plan. He visited the public library in Grafton to do research. While looking through the Grafton archives, he noticed a few statements about a record company that existed in Grafton. He had an idea of incorporating some of Grafton’s musical history into the restaurant to make it a more interesting place to visit. (A Hard Rock style café concept with a Paramount Records theme.) He was learning more and more about Paramount/NYRL and had started collecting 78s and other memorabilia to incorporate into the restaurant. He read Alex van der Tuuk’s book on the history of Paramount. Krupski got excited about bringing Grafton’s heritage back in a venue that could also help educate the local population about an important part of their hometown history. His restaurant would definitely have a Paramount theme and to get the Village onboard, he needed to educate them on this wonderful history that was being ignored. He purchased more copies of van der Tuuk’s book and gave them to the Village President and Planner along with a CD set of all of the blues music recorded in Grafton by Paramount, as well as a full copy of his business plan. Since he was searching for capital to fund the restaurant, he also gave out copies of the book to local bankers. He approached the Grafton Chamber of Commerce where he was told that another person, Angela Mack, was e-mailing the Village asking them why they hadn’t done anything with their musical heritage and was insisting that they do something about it. He was given Angela’s phone number and e-mail address, but he did not contact her immediately due to so many other concerns regarding his business plan.

Finally, Krupski locked in an offer with the owner of the building and found funding to begin construction of the Paramount Restaurant. It was during the period of time that he officially approached the Village about doing the project was when he first met Angela Mack and her husband, Patrick. As they talked about the Paramount Records history, they knew the Village was starting to also have their share of thoughts on the Paramount concept since the Village officials had always fielded complaints that “Grafton doesn’t have a theme like Cedarburg or Port Washington.”

While Krupski was pushing forward with his Paramount-themed restaurant concept, Angela connected the Grafton Area Live Arts (GALA) to bring an “Embrace the Legacy” concert series to the GALA concert hall venue. The concert series would focus on performers who could educate on Paramount history and perform songs recorded by Paramount artists. She approached Scott Oftedahl, former Grafton High School band director and current principal of Kennedy Elementary School, about bringing a blues educator to Grafton to raise the awareness of school children regarding the history of blues music and Grafton’s blues legacy. Oftedahl was more than receptive to the idea. While Angela made arrangements with GALA for the first “Embracing The Legacy” concert, Oftedahl organized plans for a combined blues education presentation/concert for all of Grafton’s elementary school children. Over 500 elementary students would be bussed to the high school auditorium for the one-hour morning blues presentation/concert on Sept. 30th, 2005. In the afternoon, the 4th grade students at Oftedahl’s Kennedy Elementary School would have a private one-hour session with the blues educator. The concert at the GALA venue would be that same evening. A Paramount history discussion panel was scheduled for Oct. 30th at the Cedarburg Arts Council.  Participants in the panel discussion would include Paramount historian, van der Tuuk, and other knowledgeable Paramount Records devotees.

I was pleasantly surprised and most grateful when Angela Mack and school Principal, Scott Oftehdahl, requested that I participate in their plans by being the blues educational presenter, as well as the performer for the first GALA “Embracing The Legacy” concert. I eagerly anticipated my visit to Grafton, the school presentation, the concert, and to visiting the Paramount historic site.

Steve Ostermann of the local Ozaukee Press staff did a superb job of publicizing all of the Paramount ‘resurrection’ efforts, including covering my visit to Grafton. “Michael “Hawkeye” Herman had Grafton school kids bouncing in their seats. In between the boogie beat, he also taught them a few things about the blues — the profound influence it has had on music they listen to every day and the vehicle it offers for expressing their emotions. Herman’s hour-long program drew praise from students, parents and educators alike. Scott Oftedahl, Kennedy Elementary School principal, said Herman’s appearance introduced students to historically important American music and showed them how relevant it remains today. We’re very fortunate to have him come here.”

The evening GALA concert was a sell out. The audience was superb. During the concert I explained to the crowd, “Grafton and Paramount Records are responsible for much of the American blues music that came out of the 1920s and 1930s. You have a great opportunity here to show people what this history is and why it’s so important. It’s not only important for students to learn about, it’s important for the community to realize what they have. You have a sleeping giant, and it’s finally starting to wake up.” An enthusiastic full house of local residents showed up at the Cedarburg Cultural Center the following day for the afternoon Paramount panel discussion.

At about this time, local Jaycees members, Kris Marshall, Ellen Zacharias, and Peter Raymond were instrumental in founding a blues society. The group used the “Let’s Get Started/How To Create A Blues Society,” article that appeared in the 2005 issue of the Blues Festival Guide as an aid in founding the Grafton Blues Association. They immediately undertook responsibility for producing the first annual Paramount Blues Festival in cooperation with the Grafton Area Jaycees. The festival will be held on Sept. 23rd, 2006 at Lime Kiln Park, in Grafton. Marshall and her committee have pulled out all the stops in planning the all day event. The festival will feature nationally recognized blues artists and local bands, including: Albert Cummings, Nora Jean Bruso, Hawkeye Herman, David Evans and Joe Filisko, Reverend Raven and the Chain Smoking Altar Boys, and The Steve Cohen Blues Band with Greg Koch. Educational workshops will be presented by well known blues historian/author Gayle Dean Wardlow, and fellow historian/musicians, David Evans and Joe Filisko. Alex van der Tuuk will be on hand to sign copies of his book and discuss the history of Paramount Records.

Angela and Patrick Mack, Jim Brunquell, Joe Krupski, Melissa Schmitz, and others, founded GIG (Grooves In Grafton), to further support and retain the history of all of the genres of music that Paramount recorded in Grafton. GIGS will present exhibits, park history displays, and educational programs “to educate, increase the awareness of, and preserve the music recorded and pressed in Grafton, Wisconsin by the New York Recording Laboratories.”

Grafton city officials, including Village President Brunquell, had been planning to spur development in the center of downtown by providing tax-incentive financing packages to businesses locating in the downtown area. They already had their eyes on plans for the construction of a downtown plaza which would help bring people back to the area. With the newfound interest in Paramount and the possibility of the Paramount-themed restaurant going in, city officials embraced the Paramount concept for the downtown Paramount Plaza. Paramount Plaza will include a saxophone-shaped fountain spewing water from the horn, and sidewalk decor inlayed to resemble piano keys that will create a Paramount Recording Artists’ Walk Of Fame, featuring the names of artists who recorded in Grafton and the approximate recording date.

Joe Krupski is in the midst of refurbishing the old courthouse building, near the future Paramount Plaza, into The Paramount Restaurant. The building was the Bienlein Hotel in the 1920s where Paramount’s artists may have stayed the night while recording in Grafton. Krupski hopes to have the restaurant up and running before the Sept. 23rd date of the Paramount Blues Festival.

Beginning March 1, 2006, the Ozaukee Bank in Grafton, a major sponsor for the Paramount Blues Festival, will host monthly exhibits presented by Grooves In Grafton (GIG) to enhance visibility for the festival and inform the community about their Paramount Records heritage. The fire of interest in local history and Paramount Records is now lit and beginning to grow. People are excited that Grafton is, at long last, getting an identity and has something to be proud of. Local folks are coming forward begging to get involved. They are excited about the opportunity to participate in something bigger than themselves that educates, entertains, and brings a sense of identity and pride to the community.

The efforts of numerous individuals interested in educating the town about their unique contribution to America’s musical history opened the eyes of many others who immediately recognized the potential to build a theme for Grafton around this important legacy. Within the next year, the face of Grafton will dramatically change. Paramount’s long kept secret legacy will finally have its chance to shine. Coming out of anonymity, the town of Grafton is embracing this legacy and is now passionate about Paramount.

In the March 2 edition of the Ozaukee Press, Steve Ostermann reported, “When blues musician and educator, Michael “Hawkeye” Herman, came to Grafton last fall to perform at schools and in concert, he spoke to local residents about their community as “a sleeping giant.” ‘Grafton,’ Herman told his audiences, ‘has chance to acknowledge its place in American music history and let the rest of the world know about a rich legacy that has long been overlooked by the general public.’ Herman’s words–which echoed the sentiments of area educators who invited him to appear locally–have not fallen on deaf ears. Since his visit last September, a growing number of residents have embraced missions publicizing Grafton’s musical heritage. The result of their efforts is the formation of groups that are organizing a blues festival, park history displays, educational programs, and a variety of other activities they hope will teach, enlighten, and entertain. The collective goal, volunteers said, is to pay tribute to the Paramount blues artists and other musicians who recorded for the former Wisconsin Chair Co.’s music division.”

History, dreams, meaningful coincidences, timing, synchronicity, networking, and the blues, came together to transform a community. For information on Grafton’s Paramount Blues Festival:

http://www.graftonblues.org

For information on Paramount Records history:

http://www.paramountshome.org

Much thanks to Michael “Hawkeye” Herman and the Blues Festival Guide for allowing Ozaukee Talent to re-publish this article.  Angela Mack (now Angie Mack Reilly) can be reached at angie@ozaukeetalent.com 

 

About Post Author

ozaukeetalent

One lesson. One song. One event at a time. Ozaukee Talent is a training and networking facility for people of all ages wanting to advance in the arts. Ozaukee Talent was founded by longtime arts leader Angie Mack in 2016. Ozaukee Talent provides private music and acting lessons, contracted event marketing, contracted arts project management, consulting, arts public speaking and performing, hosts musical events, workshops and classes in the arts. Contact: Ozaukee Talent 1701 11th Ave. Grafton WI 53024 angie@ozaukeetalent.com 262.309.4112 Follow @ozaukeetalent on Instagram and Facebook. Tax deductible donations for Ozaukee Talent through Create Wisconsin, Inc. Venmo: @ozaukeetalent PayPal: angie@ozaukeetalent.com
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Musicians Wanted

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Read Time:4 Second

PURCHASE AUDIENCE TICKETS HERE 

About Post Author

ozaukeetalent

One lesson. One song. One event at a time. Ozaukee Talent is a training and networking facility for people of all ages wanting to advance in the arts. Ozaukee Talent was founded by longtime arts leader Angie Mack in 2016. Ozaukee Talent provides private music and acting lessons, contracted event marketing, contracted arts project management, consulting, arts public speaking and performing, hosts musical events, workshops and classes in the arts. Contact: Ozaukee Talent 1701 11th Ave. Grafton WI 53024 angie@ozaukeetalent.com 262.309.4112 Follow @ozaukeetalent on Instagram and Facebook. Tax deductible donations for Ozaukee Talent through Create Wisconsin, Inc. Venmo: @ozaukeetalent PayPal: angie@ozaukeetalent.com
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Fresh Musical Talent Featured at 10-10-10 Open Mic

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Read Time:1 Minute, 52 Second

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

June 14, 2016

by Ozaukee Talent founder, Angie Mack Reilly angie@ozaukeetalent.com

On Sunday June 26 at 4pm, Ozaukee Talent will be hosting its first “10-10-10 Open Mic” at 1111 Broad Street in Grafton.  Ten acts will perform for ten minute each; giving the audience a sneak peak at fresh new local talent including “Hey Captain Knight” from this YouTube video.

Event coordinator, Angie Mack Reilly, is an internationally known Paramount Records educator who thinks that Grafton, WI needs to have a strong music scene.  “Many people don’t realize that the music recorded in Grafton, WI in the 1920s and 30s  just won a 2016 Grammy Award.  Jack White’s music preservation project, ‘The Rise and Fall of Paramount Records Volume 2’ competed against compilation projects by the Grateful Dead and Rolling Stones.”

Mack Reilly has met tourists from Russia, France, Japan, The United Kingdom, Germany, the Netherlands, New York City and more who have come to Grafton to check out the music scene.  “Grafton needs a music scene.  Period.  The world is watching.  I am hoping to drag the talented musicians that I know are in this area out of the woodwork.  It has been my experience with 18 years in the music industry that musicians can often struggle with things like confidence and promoting themselves.  As a long-time music director and teacher, it is my passion to help draw some of these musicians out.  I am expecting quite an eclectic mix of musical genres at this first open mic.  I believe that the audience is in for a big surprise.”

This open mic is the first in a series of many  coming to Grafton.  Tickets cost $10 each and can be purchased online through the Ozaukee Talent website.  The next “10-10-10 Open Mic” is scheduled for 4pm on July 24th.  The event will also coincide with a free Open Drum Circle for anyone to partake in.  Other upcoming events hosted by Ozaukee Talent include a guitar workshop with Alex Wilson and a vocal workshop with Rhonda Zolecki.  People interested in performing at the next open mic should contact Ozaukee Talent at 262.309.4112.

 

About Post Author

ozaukeetalent

One lesson. One song. One event at a time. Ozaukee Talent is a training and networking facility for people of all ages wanting to advance in the arts. Ozaukee Talent was founded by longtime arts leader Angie Mack in 2016. Ozaukee Talent provides private music and acting lessons, contracted event marketing, contracted arts project management, consulting, arts public speaking and performing, hosts musical events, workshops and classes in the arts. Contact: Ozaukee Talent 1701 11th Ave. Grafton WI 53024 angie@ozaukeetalent.com 262.309.4112 Follow @ozaukeetalent on Instagram and Facebook. Tax deductible donations for Ozaukee Talent through Create Wisconsin, Inc. Venmo: @ozaukeetalent PayPal: angie@ozaukeetalent.com
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Introducing “10-10-10” OPEN MIC in #GraftonWI

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10-10-10

by Angie Mack Reilly

Introducing a new OPEN MIC VENUE in #ozaukeecounty ……

It’s called “10-10-10” Open Mic.

10 Acts.

10 Minutes Each.

$10 Tickets. 

Three dates to choose from:  June 26th, July 24th and September 18th.  Performances begin at 4pm.

Musical acts wanting to participate must email angie@ozaukeetalent.com to reserve.  With Ozaukee Talent also being a musical promotion agency, the events will be well-marketed, giving fresh exposure and opportunities to up and coming musical talent.

Music enthusiasts around the world know about Grafton, WI.

Why?  Because of the music recorded here between 1929 and 1932 in a makeshift studio along the Milwaukee River on the corner of Falls and 12th Avenue.  Not only was there music recorded in Grafton that recently won a 2016 Grammy Award, but the record factory attached to the recording studio mass produced 25% of the nation’s “race records”.  These records went into American homes and helped shape American culture across a variety of disciplines.

So I have personally met with visitors from Japan, France, Germany, Russia, New York, Kansas, England, Washington, The Netherlands and more.  They come to Grafton looking for a museum, a music scene, or that long lost 78 recording.   Authors such as Amanda Petrusich, Alex van der Tuuk, Akira Kikuchi and my Russian author friend have come to Grafton to gather information for their books.

It’s only fitting to have an Open Mic in Grafton, right across the street from where the Interurban Train dropped off musicians (now the tennis courts).

The venue location is 1111 Broad Street, Grafton WI.

OTHER OZAUKEE TALENT EVENTS

 

About Post Author

ozaukeetalent

One lesson. One song. One event at a time. Ozaukee Talent is a training and networking facility for people of all ages wanting to advance in the arts. Ozaukee Talent was founded by longtime arts leader Angie Mack in 2016. Ozaukee Talent provides private music and acting lessons, contracted event marketing, contracted arts project management, consulting, arts public speaking and performing, hosts musical events, workshops and classes in the arts. Contact: Ozaukee Talent 1701 11th Ave. Grafton WI 53024 angie@ozaukeetalent.com 262.309.4112 Follow @ozaukeetalent on Instagram and Facebook. Tax deductible donations for Ozaukee Talent through Create Wisconsin, Inc. Venmo: @ozaukeetalent PayPal: angie@ozaukeetalent.com
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